Sunday, 28 June 2015

Book Review: Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

About the book:
Title: Everything, Everything
Published by:  Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Published on: September 1st, 2015
Pages: 320 pages
Genre: Young-adult
Rating: 5/5
Book Blurb: This innovative, heartfelt debut novel tells the story of a girl who’s literally allergic to the outside world. When a new family moves in next door, she begins a complicated romance that challenges everything she’s ever known. The narrative unfolds via vignettes, diary entries, texts, charts, lists, illustrations, and more.

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster

About the author
Nicola Yoon grew up in Jamaica (the island) and Brooklyn (part of Long Island). She currently resides in Los Angeles, CA with her husband and daughter, both of whom she loves beyond all reason. Everything, Everything is her first novel.

Find the author here: 


Social media:
                         


My Review:

Everything, Everything is the kind of young-adult book which you will hate and love in equal measures, and you certainly wouldn't be able to leave it once you start it. Touching upon themes like love, relationships (and not just romantic ones), rare disease, coping with grief, this book is certainly one of the best you'll read this year, and certainly one of the best in the genre.

It is a fictional account of Maddy who suffers from an illness called SCID, and she'll endear herself to you in practically no time.
The opening lines go like this, "I’VE READ MANY more books than you. It doesn’t matter how
many you’ve read. I’ve read more. Believe me. I’ve had the time"
These lines are like a trailer to the rest of the book. It has a warmth, an innocence, a humor, a playfulness and a certain poignant feel of tragedy, which is so unknown of books in this genre.
If I've ever read a book which encompassed so many human emotions in gloriously heart-warming paragraphs, I'd say it was in John Green's Paper Towns.

"My birthday is the one day of the year that we’re both most
acutely aware of my illness. It’s the acknowledging of the passage
of time that does it. Another whole year of being sick, no
hope for a cure on the horizon. Another year of missing all
the normal teenagery things—learner’s permit, first kiss, prom,
first heartbreak, first fender bender. Another year of my mom
doing nothing but working and taking care of me. Every other
day these omissions are easy, easier at least, to ignore.
This year is a little harder than the previous. Maybe it’s because
I’m eighteen now. Technically, I’m an adult. I should be
leaving home, going off to college. My mom should be dreading
empty-nest syndrome. But because of SCID, I’m not going
anywhere."
For many of us, this book has been resting on our to-read shelves for half as long as it took for this book to transform from a manuscript into a published masterpiece. Because, this is the kind of book that stays with you long after you've deserted it.

I use the adjective heart-warming. But I do believe that the plot is both heart-warming and heart-shattering at the same time. The brilliance with which the plot has been etched is so sheer, and so well-executed that I cannot even talk about the author's creative prowess without giving it all away.
To say that the story line is well thought out, would be an understatement- it is far too perfect for a debut.
The protagonist of our story, Madeline Whittier is doctored by her mother, who puts her medical skills to the best use. But her skills cannot help much, for when you are allergic to the whole world, so vulnerable and so fragile, life doesn't appear very exciting no matter what. This is when her neighbours move in, and it changes everything. What the story has in store of you is humor, warmth, romance, defiance, revelations, and tests of relationships unlike ever before, and in abundance.

The characters are equally well thought-out, what with their quirks and eccentricities.
The book, through its unforgettable characters unfailingly brings out human foibles  and the oddities and frailties of life. It is an absolute intriguing read. It will make you stare in disbelief at the twists of fate, it will choke your heart with a fullness that only certain actions can provoke. You'll cry. But not once will you think of leaving the book- this is how strong the charm is.

What also makes this book a fast read, is the use of vignettes, diary entries, charts, illustrations, images.
Carla, Madaline's nurse, Olly and his family- all characters are so important to the plot, and so unforgettable. Never once do you feel like skimming through the pages, rather you re-read the paragraphs, devour them and let them ruin your peace or make you erupt in laughter.

Olly's and maddy's romance will have you gleaming in childish delight, and you'll ship them in no time.
If this book doesn't give you the feels, you perhaps haven't read it right.
Just a warning, though: You might throw this book after reading because it will hurt too much when reality and truth strike.

Links to the book:




                                         



Quotes from the book:



For more quotes, follow:

     

Source of the review copy: Netgalley



>

To get your book reviewed, read my review policy here. And then contact me here.

Follow for regular reviews, author interviews and bookish love:
                        

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Popular Posts